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, based on what we know right now about the various details of what they're talking about in washington, you've liked stocks anyway. is this framework they're talking about a green light to buy stocks for you? >> it is. yes. we were pretty optimistic going into 2013. this just improves the outlook. >> in what way? how? >> well, i think some finality around where taxes are going to be is going to be very, very helpful. we can manage around the different tax rates in terms of capital gains issues and whatnot within portfolio locations. so knowing what those rates are going to be in managing around that will be helpful. stocks right now attractive from a valuation standpoint. i think it'll be a good 2013. >> brad fredelander, you have been skeptical of the market. does this deal help, do you think? >> well, it's certainly good news. i think -- i do have some concern that the market es at this point are in more fiscal harmony than the discord we've been seeing. we still have within six to eight weeks the debt limit issues as well. so i think there are going to be some hurdles early in the y
of a resolution, but right now the comments that we got a couple of minutes ago out of washington does not really help the situation. >> so what's the strategy, jonathan? what's the strategy given the comments that we just heard. >> not knowing what taxes will be like next year, i agree with what you said before earlier. you have to take some of the profits off the table, pear down some of your risk and exposure and hold on to ones that you think in the locker term will have performing gains. >> joining us late, the comments we're talking about came from senate majority leader harry reid who said he does not expect a deal before christmas, and he also said if the republicans are expecting the democrats to come up with a list of spending cuts they want, it's not going to happen. they are expecting the republicans to come forward with that first. those are the comments that we've been talking about. carol roth, you're the one that's been identifying those financial planners who are telling their clients sell those winners, and to hang on to the losers here. >> right. this is completely backwards to
house around 3:15 eastern. our john harwood is in washington with some more details on what we know right now. john? >> reporter: well, bill, the horror of this tragedy is also muted talk of anything else in washington for the day, including the fiscal cliff and all the issues that we've been discussing for some time now, but one of the jobs of a president is to console victims and to console the nation at a time of grief of this magnitude, so we're going to hear from the president at 3:15. jay carney earlier saying he wasn't going to discuss issues like gun control. it wasn't a day for politics. it's a day to focus on the victims of the tragedy, so you can expect the president is going to focus his remarks on the victims and what happened in connecticut and the attempt to figure out how it happened, why it happened. we'll hear from him at 3:15, and we're going to bring that to you, and we'll talk about it afterwards. >> all right, john, thank you very much. of course, we often talk about how the markets are a mood reflector, and if that's the case, we very much see a market that is
of questions focusing on the issue. washington correspondent john harwood at the white house right now. john, perhaps no one has followed the twists and turns as much as you in all of these negotiations. why now does it feel like things are not in as good a place as we thought? >> because there's a lot of resistance within the republican caucus, maria, to the idea of raising taxes on anyone so that the concession that john boehner made toward the president, while it didn't go nearly as far as the president wanted, is one that's very difficult for him to maintain within his caucus. we've heard the club for growth come out this afternoon and owe poets speaker's plan "b" even though the grover norquist group, american for tax reform, says it's not an increase, but that balancing act is making it difficult for john boehner to respond to the offer the president laid down so he walked away, said that the president's offer was not balanced, didn't have enough spending cuts, and the president in trying to drive home the case that the speaker needs to cooperate with him and compromise with him, came
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4